paleolithic

Are liquid carbohydrates evolutionarily novel?

 In the debate surrounding the NYC ban on large soft drinks earlier this year, the argument came up that we had to regulate them because liquid calories are evolutionarily novel and inappropriate for our species to consume because we cannot consume them moderately and their metabolism is harmful to our bodies.

Do we know what paleolithic humans ate?

 Hands down the best health book I read this year was The Definitive H.P. Lovecraft: 67 Tales of Horror in One Volume. Despite being about fictional creatures of terror from unholy abysses, I learned quite a bit from Lovecraft's depiction of the universe. The humans in Lovecraft's stories are baptized into the knowledge that the universe is older and more incomprehensible than they could have ever imagined.

Is rice paleo?

 Grains are evil. The people in the paleolithic didn't eat them. Amirite? Unfortunately, that hypothesis is contradicted by archeological evidence, but now there is genetic evidence that rice may have been domesticated earlier than thought. 

The Darker Side of "The Original Affluent Society"

 This is one of the better articles I've read lately. It addresses serious errors common to works that cite the Paleolithic and foraging societies at being an apex of human welfare. Some of these errors include 

Yes, we are smothering our children

 In negative reviews of books on so-called "attachment parenting" like The Continuum Concept people often harp on about how it's "smothering" and emphasis the children at the expense of other social relationships. I suspect those people haven't read the book. The foraging horticulturalists in that book, for example, do breastfeed their children, sleep with them, and carry them around close to their bodies.

The Human Colon in Evolution: Part 2, Fiber Foolishness

Suggestions that humans may have obtained more calories from SCFA in the past are rooted in estimates of fiber consumption from the Paleolithic. Evidence is rather sparse and limited to coprolites. In the burgeoning field of evolutionary medicine, anthropologists have become very interested in the Paleolithic diet and its relevance for promoting health today. Some of the landmark papers in the field have cited these coprolite studies as evidence for fiber intakes as high as 150 grams as day, well over what any known human culture currently consumes (M. Konner & S Boyd Eaton, 2010).

I kissed a lectin and I liked it

True or false: